Review: Untold by Sarah Rees Brennan

The Details

Publisher:  Simon & Schuster UK
Published: August 29th, 2013
Genres:  YA, romance, paranormal, Gothic,
My Rating: 3 Stars

15801763 GoodReads Review 

It’s time to choose sides…. 

On the surface, Sorry-in-the-Vale is a sleepy English town. But Kami Glass knows the truth. Sorry-in-the-Vale is full of magic. In the old days, the Lynburn family ruled with fear, terrifying the people into submission in order to kill for blood and power. Now the Lynburns are back, and Rob Lynburn is gathering sorcerers so that the town can return to the old ways.

But Rob and his followers aren’t the only sorcerers in town. A decision must be made: pay the blood sacrifice, or fight. For Kami, this means more than just choosing between good and evil. With her link to Jared Lynburn severed, she’s now free to love anyone she chooses. But who should that be?

A darkly humorous take on Gothic romance, Sarah Rees Brennan’s Lynburn Legacy weaves together the tale of a heroine desperate to protect those she loves, two boys hoping to be saved, and the magical forces that will shape their destiny.

My Review

Just as a note this is the second book in a series so this review may contain spoilers of the first book. You can read my review of that book here

This book starts out with a great action scene with scarecrows come to life and fire and a battle. It’s great.

However, this book really reads like the middle book in a series. It feels like it’s building up to something that’s going to happen in the next book. I liked the first book more than this one because I felt like more happened in the first book. This book does dwell on what happened at the end of the last book with Kami and Jared and their link. They spend a lot of time avoiding each other because they think the other one is angry at the other one about the link. It’s a classic case of “communication used for drama” which I find annoying.

This book does develop the rest of the characters which is something I felt was missing from the first book. We learn more about Angela and Rusty’s life. We learn a lot of Rusty and his life and backstory. We also learn about Holly. These characters feel much less flat in the second book than the first.

There is a lot of coming up with a plan, and very little acting on the plan. A lot of build up for very little result, this is an issue that I find a lot of in second books. It feels like a bridge instead of a complete story.

Kami is an interesting and fun character. She’s a great narrator, and I enjoy reading her interpretation of the story unfolding around her. She has a distinct way of talking, that can be a little hard to follow, especially if you are unfamiliar with British colloquialisms but once you get used to it, her way of talking becomes easy to understand and follow.

I am interested in finishing these series. I want to know what happens in the battle with the Lynburns. I find Sarah Ress Brennan to be a very interesting writer and I’m attached to the characters.

So far I am recommending this series as a different and witty view of a gothic novel. It’s a different way of looking at magic and small towns. Kami is a great strong character. I will be reading the third book of this series soon (I got a couple ARCS and a book club books to read first). I will be writing a review of that book when I finish it.

Have you read the Lynburn Legacy novels? What did you think?

Until next time Internet,

Deanna

Review: Caraval by Stephanie Garber

The Details

Publisher: Flatiron Books
Published:  January 31, 2017
Genres:  YA, mystery, romance
My Rating: 4.75 Stars

27883214GoodReads Blurb 

Scarlett Dragna has never left the tiny island where she and her sister, Tella, live with their powerful, and cruel, father. Now Scarlett’s father has arranged a marriage for her, and Scarlett thinks her dreams of seeing Caraval—the faraway, once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show—are over.

But this year, Scarlett’s long-dreamt-of invitation finally arrives. With the help of a mysterious sailor, Tella whisks Scarlett away to the show. Only, as soon as they arrive, Tella is kidnapped by Caraval’s mastermind organizer, Legend. It turns out that this season’s Caraval revolves around Tella, and whoever finds her first is the winner.

Scarlett has been told that everything that happens during Caraval is only an elaborate performance. Nevertheless, she becomes enmeshed in a game of love, heartbreak, and magic. And whether Caraval is real or not, Scarlett must find Tella before the five nights of the game are over, or a dangerous domino effect of consequences will be set off, and her beloved sister will disappear forever.

Welcome, welcome to Caraval…beware of getting swept too far away.

My Review

I wasn’t sure about this book when I first heard about it when I started blogging earlier this year. I’m a fan of fantastical TV shows, but I usually have a hard time getting into fantasy books, but there was something about this one that dragged me in from the first page. Maybe it was the letters, it was different than anything I had read before. I was transported to this different world quickly. I learned enough about Scarlett and her family within a few hundred words through those letters.

I loved the synesthesia, how Scarlett feels colors. How she would say that things felt purple or how people radiated different colors. The thread of purple throughout the whole story was interesting too. From her grandmother’s purple dress, to how her father smelled like rotten plums, and there many any other examples. The metaphor and the thoughtfulness that Garber used in creating this world is beautiful.

I, also, really enjoyed the sibling relationship. I don’t think I’ve read too many books that are about sisters, definitely few that are about sisters that actually like each other. Positive female relationships and friendship are for whatever reason are rarely shown in media, so I think that the love Scarlett and Tella have for each other is so deep and pure. I try very hard not to give spoilers in my reviews, so you’ll just have to trust me when I say that their love is very important to the whole story.

The world of the Caraval, was so cool. I would love to read about a person who was playing while not so personally involved in the game, just a casual player to see how the world is different for them. This may be a stretch but, the Caraval world reminds me of  GisHwHes and the world that that creates for the players of the hunt. In that week reality is suspended. Nothing is normal. GIshwhEs has strange little riddles and messages from a Misha Collins, who at times in the scavenger hunt, becomes a person much like Legend: a mysterious, somewhat insane, somewhat cruel puppet master. All of a sudden you are out trying to get permission to be on a Nuclear submarine with a hammock while the rest of the world looks at these people wearing pineapples for shoes and lettuce skirts and wonders what the heck. That’s how reading about Caraval felt to me. I was the person looking at the people in the cheese dresses wondering why on Earth anyone would do that. Caraval had that same feel. A feeling of suspended reality, if only for a few days. The biggest difference is the suspension of reality in the book is real, separate from the rest of the world. GisHwheS co-exists with the real world.

I didn’t feel like the romance with Julian was exactly necessary, but I do understand it’s purpose. The idea of choice, which is so huge in the story. This book is just a giant story about choosing what is right for you, taking a leap, running outside your comfort zone.

I would most definitely recommend this book widely. Although there are fantastical elements, and magic does play a large part of the book, it is so rich with metaphor and symbolism. I am going to re-read it before I read the sequel when it comes out next year, I know have my first got to read book of 2018.

Garber has created an amazing world with Caraval, and I anxiously await the second book of this series.

Have you read Caraval? Were you dazzled by the world?

Until next time Internet,

Deanna

Review: Shine by Lauren Myracle

The Details

Publisher: Amulet Books
Published:  May 1st, 2011
Genres:  YA, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, LGBT+, Mystery
My Rating: 5 Stars

8928054GoodReads Blub

When her best guy friend falls victim to a vicious hate crime, sixteen-year-old Cat sets out to discover who in her small town did it. Richly atmospheric, this daring mystery mines the secrets of a tightly knit Southern community and examines the strength of will it takes to go against everyone you know in the name of justice.

Against a backdrop of poverty, clannishness, drugs, and intolerance, Myracle has crafted a harrowing coming-of-age tale couched in a deeply intelligent mystery. Smart, fearless, and compassionate, this is an unforgettable work from a beloved author.

My Review

This is a book about being “different” in a small town. It’s a story about what being gay in a small town with deep-seated bigotry is like. This book is raw and heartbreaking. What happens to Patrick, the best friend of the main character is terrible, and it’s doubly terrible because it doesn’t take place now, and we still see things like what happened to  Patrick happening. I’m a little older than the average YA reader (well, the intended audience of a YA reader), so I remember seeing what happened to Matthew Sheppard on the news and watching those Dateline stories. What happened to Patrick is very close to what happened there, and it’s terrifying to think that things like that still happen.

Shine doesn’t glamourize southern-ness if that makes sense. It doesn’t paint a picture of the whitewashed, clean, version I think comes to mind when people think of the south. It’s not big houses and old ladies sitting on porch swings drinking sweet tea. It’s dirty and shows that there are terrible things happening.

This book was hard to read because of how raw and emotional it was as Cat tries so hard to figure out how and why this happened to Patrick since it seems like no one else cares. In order for her to do that, she has to go into herself and learn to be honest with herself and speak up for herself in ways she never thought she could. There are a lot of things that could trigger people within it.

Cat is something. Cat is a great character. The importance of being true to yourself and speaking the truth even when it’s hard or scary or has consequences is developed throughout the whole book.

I found this book amazing, and I highly recommend it. I would recommend that anyone looking to read it, look into the trigger warnings, there is sexual assault, homophobia, and a bunch of other topics that I know make some things extremely hard, or impossible to read. However, this book is great. Myracle did something wonderful with this book and her characters. I have never read a book like it, and I doubt I ever will again.

 

Until next time Internet,

 

Deanna

Personal note: I know I’ve been lacking a little with my blogging. Late May and Early June are difficult times for me, which if you’ve been following my posts I’m sure you caught. I will be falling back into my regular blogging schedule this week.  Thank you for following my blog and liking and commenting. Happy Reading!

Review- Unspoekn by Sarah Rees Brennan

The Details

Publisher:  Random House Books for Young Readers
Published:  September 11, 2012
Genres:  YA, fantasy, paranormal
My Rating: 3.75 Stars

17162405

GoodReads Blurb

Kami Glass loves someone she’s never met… a boy she’s talked to in her head ever since she was born. She wasn’t silent about her imaginary friend during her childhood, and is thus a bit of an outsider in her sleepy English town of Sorry-in-the-Vale. Still, Kami hasn’t suffered too much from not fitting in. She has a best friend, runs the school newspaper, and is only occasionally caught talking to herself. Her life is in order, just the way she likes it, despite the voice in her head.

But all that changes when the Lynburns return.

The Lynburn family has owned the spectacular and sinister manor that overlooks Sorry-in-the-Vale for centuries. The mysterious twin sisters who abandoned their ancestral home a generation ago are back, along with their teenage sons, Jared and Ash, one of whom is eerily familiar to Kami. Kami is not one to shy away from the unknown—in fact, she’s determined to find answers for all the questions Sorry-in-the-Vale is suddenly posing. Who is responsible for the bloody deeds in the depths of the woods? What is her own mother hiding? And now that her imaginary friend has become a real boy, does she still love him? Does she hate him? Can she trust him?

My Review

So, fun story about me. I have a terrible habit of calling famous people I follow on Twitter and Facebook “my friend.” In no person am I guiltier of doing this than Jared Padalecki from Supernatural. In the last few years I have said “My Friend Jared” and then talked about the Always Keep Fighting Campain as if a person I actually know was involved in it. I’ve been called out many a time. One memorable one being my mother saying to me “You don’t know anyone named Jared.” Although one time he did like a comment I made on a Facebook Live he did and therefore we are friends and I will fight you.

So I feel a weird connection to Kami. I  have never talked to other people in my head or heard other people’s thoughts, but still. I felt an understanding with Kami.

There were parts of this book that I felt didn’t exactly make sense. I felt that Holly and Angela accepted Kami’s explanation that flesh and blood Jared standing in front of them is the same Jared that Kami’s been talking to in her head too easily. I also felt the romances were a little forced. But overall I enjoyed this novel.

There’s a lot going on in this book, murder, magic, mystery, people that can read one other person’s mind, animal sacrifice, breaking and entering. And for the most part, it’s laid out pretty straightforwardly. I feel like some of the dialogue is wonky, but I think it may be a “language barrier” between American English and British English. There are parts of Harry Potter dialogue that still make no sense to me.

This is a good modern Gothic novel, which after reading some Victorian Gothic novels, I enjoyed seeing how those themes aged through time. I liked those elements that I’ve seen in Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights in a brand new story. Even my least favorite element, Cousin Marriage, survived. Stop marrying your first cousins. I have seen so much cousin marriage in media the last few months it’s getting a little weird. Everywhere I look COUSIN MARRIAGE.

I like the mystery, the who and why. I think it’ll be an interesting series as I continue reading it. I think there is a lot to explore. The history of the town and Lynburns is going to be interesting as it continues to unfold. I recommend this novel to people looking for something a little creepy and odd. It was a fun quick read.

Have you read any of The Lynburn Legacy? What did you think?

Until next time Internet

 

Deanna

Review: Bittersweet by Sarah Ockler

The Details

Publisher:  Simon Pulse
Published:  January 3, 2012
Genres:  YA, romance, contemporary
My Rating: 4.5 Stars

12478533 GoodReads Blurb

Once upon a time, Hudson knew exactly what her future looked like. Then a betrayal changed her life, and knocked her dreams to the ground. Now she’s a girl who doesn’t believe in second chances… a girl who stays under the radar by baking cupcakes at her mom’s diner and obsessing over what might have been.

So when things start looking up and she has another shot at her dreams, Hudson is equal parts hopeful and terrified. Of course, this is also the moment a cute, sweet guy walks into her life… and starts serving up some seriously mixed signals. She’s got a lot on her plate, and for a girl who’s been burned before, risking it all is easier said than done.

It’s time for Hudson to ask herself what she really wants, and how much she’s willing to sacrifice to get it. Because in a place where opportunities are fleeting, she knows this chance may very well be her last.

 

Review:

I loved this story. There is something about it that struck me personally that I connected so much with Hudson and her life. I’m not a figure skater or have my life figured out, but I do love baking cupcakes and miss reading signals from boys is a specialty of mine. While reading this book, I texted my friends and kept saying “How does Sarah Ockler know my life!?!” It’s a really cute, thoughtful book I think many people can relate to.

The book is mainly about a girl trying to figure out what she wants from life. She used to be a figure skater, a very good figure skater, but after her parents had divorced, she hung up her skates to help her mom out with her brother and the diner than her mom runs. Hudson hates waitressing but feels like she has to do it. Hudson takes on a lot of side responsibilities. She cooks desserts for the diner, mainly cupcakes. There are a bunch of super cute cupcake recipes spread out within the books. I still want to try some of them out. Hudson also decides to take out helping out the school hockey team, teaching them the basics of skating, much like how football players take ballet for better footwork. She teaches the boys the finer points of skating to help them during their games. On top of all that, Hudson is secretly working on a new routine to win a scholarship for college.

Hudson does so much that some of her other responsibilities get left behind. She’s not doing as much as she should at the diner or at home. Her friendships suffer. Although her best friend is kind of a douche and doesn’t see that Hudson is struggling and just is a jerk about Hudson not spending time with her.

There is brilliance in the way that Ockler is able to write Hudson’s juggling and losing her battle to keep everything going. Sometimes a person takes on too much, and Hudson realizing that is such a huge, pivotal part of the book. It’s an awakening in a way, that was probably the biggest thing I took away from it.

This book was a very quick read, enjoyable in the way that I find many a YA romance. There is something about finding that first love that gets me every time.

I have read one other Sarah Ockler book, Twenty Boy Summer, and I’ve discovered via GoodReads that she has a couple more books. I’m going to have to scoop them up. When a writer can write first love and understands the immense stress that teenagers go through trying to juggle everything, their books are definitely worth looking into.

I highly recommend this book to lovers of love who are looking for a book that is about more than just love the story. It’s a really great book.

Have you read Bittersweet? Or any other Sarah Ockler? Let me know what you thought!

 

Until next time Internet,

Deanna

 

Review: The Infinite Moment of Us

The Details

Publisher:  Amulet Books
Published:  August 27, 2013
Genres:  YA, romance, contemporary
My Rating: 3 Stars

17290266Goodreads Blurb

For as long as she can remember, Wren Gray’s goal has been to please her parents. But as high school graduation nears, so does an uncomfortable realization: Pleasing her parents once overlapped with pleasing herself, but now… not so much. Wren needs to honor her own desires, but how can she if she doesn’t even know what they are?

Charlie Parker, on the other hand, is painfully aware of his heart’s desire. A gentle boy with a troubled past, Charlie has loved Wren since the day he first saw her. But a girl like Wren would never fall for a guy like Charlie—at least not the sort of guy Charlie believes himself to be.

And yet certain things are written in the stars. And in the summer after high school, Wren and Charlie’s souls will collide. But souls are complicated, as are the bodies that house them…

Sexy, romantic, and oh-so-true to life, this is an unforgettable look at first love from one of young adult fiction’s greatest writers

MY REVIEW

I enjoyed this book. However, there were some unfinished storylines and some problematic issues that I had that keeps this book from being four stars from me. It had so much potential, but I feel like it fell flat in many spots where it could have really shined.

It reminds me of Judy Blume’s Forever, only not quite as good. I mean, Forever is probably the best sex and relationship YA book ever to exist. The Infinite Moment of Us tries, and to be honest, it does hit notes of a teenage relationship in mid-2010’s, but not enough of them.

There is a fair amount of slut shaming. There’s a character named Starla, she’s promiscuous and has a rough past. I felt reading the book that both narrators, Charlie and Wren, looked upon Starla as something to be pitied. Wren and her best friend both discussed how Wren was much better than Starla because Starla was known to get around whereas Wren was clean and pure and wholesome and from a good family. I know this is a thing that happens in high school. It’s how girls talk to and about each other, but because of other elements of this book the Starla is dirty and Wren is bright and clean aspect of it is very unhealthy and gives the wrong impression to a reader about what is and isn’t acceptable.

There are some anti-feminist things, which doesn’t bother me, except compounded with the virgin/whore dynamic between Wren and Starla. Wren’s best friend, Tessa, talks to Charlie about how “girls like to have sex.” I saw it as more how Wren would want a sexual relationship, but it can be read both ways. Some of the reviews if this book that I read on GoodReads talked about how weird this was, for the boyfriend to go to the best friend. However, in my experience, girls talk to each other about this kind of stuff in a way that they don’t with significant others. Charlie is just trying to learn about Wren, so he goes the source, the best friend. Is it super weird, yes, but still teenage girls talk to their girlfriends about a lot of things. I would imagine if someone wanted to know more about me, they would go to Jen or my other close friends. I would assume it would be to find out what kind of food I like and what items of Harry Potter and Supernatural merchandise I already own so they can buy me a present and not about positions, but who knows?

Tessa talks about a male dominated, male aggressive kind of relationship where the girl is submissive and does what the guy wants. Your sex life if up to you, but to think that there is only one way to have this kind of relationship isn’t okay. In Starla’s relationship with Charlie, Starla is in charge. It was very clear that Starla set the rules for the relationship. This to me plays a little into the “good and bad” relationship that is woven throughout the book. Tessa’s description of the kind of relationship that Wren would want makes Charlie believe that everything he and Starla were was wrong and even dirtier. Girls shouldn’t be like Starla, they should be like Wren. Girls can be both.

There are some, it’s not graphic, but its detailed, depictions of sex acts, and the only part of that that really bothers me is that Wren wants to have unprotected sex. It’s made to seem like a good and understandable decision. These characters are 18 years old and graduate high school at the beginning of the book. Unprotected sex probably isn’t a good choice. This is a Young Adult book, and is obviously targeted to older teens, but just say yes to condoms.

There are some storylines that don’t have a resolution, Starla’s in particular. There was so much more that could have been done with Starla. I left the book wanting to know more about what happens to her, how she comes out of these events. I feel so bad for her. I wanted to protect her, which I really don’t feel was the point of her character, but nonetheless is how I felt walking away from the story. I feel like there is a potential for a second book which would wrap this up, but as of right now there isn’t. There are so many loose ends that it would make sense to have a follow-up.

I feel like there is a potential for a second book which would wrap this up, but as of right now there isn’t. There are so many loose ends that it would make sense to have a follow-up. There was a complete story but it read like (this is going be the weirdest analogy ever) during the writers strike when most TV shows had shortened seasons. Storylines were introduced in the first half of the season, then the strike happened, so those storylines weren’t picked up again and forgotten. There are just a lot of loose ends.

All in all, I did enjoy this book. I like the way Lauren Myracle writes, but there were pieces of this books that just don’t sit right with me after thinking about it for a few days. I mean if I didn’t hyper-analyze it to write a blog post about it I may have enjoyed it more, but thinking about book critically was something I was doing before I wrote about them online. It felt like there was a much bigger book planned and pieces got cut out but that whole storyline wasn’t removed, does that make sense?

I felt slightly let down by this book, I didn’t have the highest of hopes because of the mixed reviews on GoodReads, but I still think there was a greater potential than what ended up happening.

Until next time Internet,

Deanna

 

 

 

Blackmailed Cousin Marriage for Revenge and Other Things.

Let me begin by saying I enjoyed listening to this Wuthering Heights. I found it frustrating and weird as all heck, but I enjoyed it. Also, this book is 170 years old so spoilers. There are also some Harry Potter spoilers within.

One of the thoughts I had most often listening to this book was “Why is everyone so terrible.” Maybe all people with money were just terrible people in Victorian England because I thought the same of Mr. Rochester in Jane Eyre, I don’t know. My second most common thought was “I wonder if JK Rowling based Snape of Heathcliff because they are basically the same human being.”

Let’s begin what I’m sure will be a long winded journey with why I dislike Snape really quick before I move into a discussion of Heathcliff. Snape’s motives throughout the whole 7 books of Harry Potter is his “love” of Lily Potter. Because he “loves” Lily so much, he has to be a jerk to Harry. If Snape had stayed the same way he was in the first book, cold, but still moderately helpful, I think he would have been fine. However, as Harry gets older and –to Snape– became more like James, Snape becomes crueler and crueler to this teenage boy because he felt wrong by the boy’s mother over 20 years earlier. Listen, Snape, you called your best friend a racial slur in front of a bunch of people and then got mad that she didn’t want to hang out with you anymore. Chill. On top of this, his treatment to Neville –and Gryffindors in general– is petty high school crap that a 31-year-old man (as he was in the first book) is still be hung up on. It’s time to move on. Snape is an interesting character, a well-written, great character, but he was a terrible human being.

And now Heathcliff, who got mad that his adopted sister didn’t wait for him after he ran away and instead married a man of means that I think she loved– in her own way– so he was manipulated every situation possible to steal land and make the heirs of his adopted family miserable.

From what I got out of the book, Heathcliff was a street orphan in Liverpool, so Mr. Earnshaw saved him from being Oliver Twist (or possibly kidnapped him) and brought him home to live with his family which has two children approximately his age.

As he grows up he falls in love with is adopted sister Cathrine, and she falls for him. However, this is Victorian England and marrying into a good (read: rich) family is important. As Heathcliff realizes that he will never marry her, he runs away to do who knows what, perhaps join the army, and when he returns Catherine is married to the neighbor boy Edgar Lindon. Heathcliff is so angry about this that he moves into his childhood home where his adopted brother, Hindley, lives and through some means gets his brother to mortgage his house through Heathcliff so that when Hinley dies a short time later, he gets the house. Heathcliff then decides that he will treat Hinley’s son, Hareton, like a servant kind of– a farm hand, which from what I understand is how Heathcliff grew up for the most part. He deprives this young man of growing up to be a gentleman like his father and grandfather, as his family name should allow him to be. Because of Heathcliff, Hareton doesn’t learn to read or write and never gets any kind of schooling.

Heathcliff was never particularly pleasant, but the way he treated Hareton really started to turn me against him.

Out of spite (?) or possibly hatred, Heathcliff married Cathrine’s sister-in-law. In his mind, he is formulating a plan to get the house that the Lindon’s live in. I cannot for the life of me figure out why he wants it so much. He does discuss wanting to get rid of it, and all thoughts of the Lindon family along with it, but I don’t understand.

After Cathrine dies in childbirth with her daughter, Cathy, Heathcliff’s wife realizes that his is not just a misunderstood misanthrope but a terrible human being, and leaves him, several months later giving birth to Heathcliff’s child that she (not confusingly) named Lindon.

It should be mentioned that Cathy is described as looking much more like her father than her mother, except for her eyes, she has Cathrine’s eyes. (This will be important later)

Mrs. Heathcliff dies, and Lindon is sent to live with his uncle, Edgar, and his cousin Cathy. However, Heathcliff discovers that his has a son and decides to take him, even though Lindon had never known his father and knew his uncle and Heathcliff didn’t like children. Because to Heathcliff, Lindon is his property and Heathcliff is obsessed with wanting what is his.

Some time passes, and for whatever reason, young Cathy falls in love with her first cousin Lindon, and Cathy’s father forbids her to see him, but Heathcliff manipulates everything until Heathcliff basically kidnaps and imprisons Cathy while her father is on his deathbed until she agrees to, and then formally marries Lindon her terminally ill cousin. Heathcliff does this because he knows Cathy’s father is dying and that in his will he would pass down the house and lands to Cathy. If Cathy is married it will go directly to her husband.  THEN Heathcliff locks her in a room so she can’t go see her dying father so she can’t tell him that she’s married to Lindon so that he doesn’t have time before dying to change his will.

Then Lindon dies of tuberculosis, and Heathcliff gets the Grange!

This is the part where the Snape stuff really started to hit me.

Heathcliff arrives at his new property, The Grange, and dismisses the servants and decides what he wants and what he doesn’t want to keep. One thing that Heathcliff personally takes is a portrait of Cathrine that was part of a pair with her husband that hung in the parlor. Listening to that part, reminded me so much of Snape ripping apart the photo of the Potter Family and the piece of the letter he found with Lily’s signature from the house in Godric’s Hallow. Heathcliff is forcibly removing Cathrine from her family. Heathcliff also does this super creepy thing where he breaks into her coffin and breaks the side of it so that when he dies, he can have his coffin fitted to it. Which reminds me of the scene in the Deathly Hallows movie where Snape cuddles the dead body of Lily while baby Harry cries in the crib behind him.

Hareton, Hindley’s son that became Heathcliff’s ward, still lives at Wuthering Heights working as a farm hand at this point in the story. Hareton and Cathy now both live there living under Heathcliff’s thumb as he sometimes violently attacks and berated them for existing in his presence. Much like Snape does to Harry. I equate Cathy with Harry and Hareton with Neville a lot in this part of the story. Hindley was never kind to Heathcliff, but I never felt that he was cruel to him. They were just guys that didn’t like each other. Hindley was jealous that his father favored Heathcliff when they were children, but they are now adults. However, after Hindley dies, Heathcliff makes sure that Hareton will have nothing. That he is nothing, the same way that Snape, time and time again, cuts Neville Longbottom off at the knees as he tries his hardest to do everything his teacher says. Like Harry and Neville, both Cathy and Hareton have the power to change the course of things in the book, and in the end, they both, in their own way do.

There comes a moment late in the book where (first cousins) Hareton and Cathy (who are now secretly courting) are reading by the fire, and they look up at Heathcliff. Heathcliff is struck by the fact that they have the same eyes. Cathrine’s eyes, because they are first cousins and these are apparently the family eyes. I’m sure that along with the extra arms their children will have also have the same eyes. STOP MARRYING YOUR COUSIN! Cathy marries all of her cousins. Like go into town and meet someone you are not related to.

Sorry, anyway, Heathcliff looks into these four eyes and sees Cathrine’s eyes and it changes him and then he, like, starves to death because of the ghost of Cathrine. That’s how I understood it.

Snape and Heathcliff both feel that this incredible wrong was done to them by the women they love. I do feel like Heathcliff has an actual argument for this one because Cathrine did say that she would marry him and then changed her mind when she realized they wouldn’t have any money. But to hold onto that for over 20 years and then take it out on children who had nothing to do with it because you can’t take it out on the actual person because they are dead is gross inexcusable behavior. Snape, as I mentioned above, does the same thing. He takes out his grievances with his former classmates and former members of the Orginal Order of the Phoenix out on the second generation, his students who he is responsible for. It’s not cool, and I don’t understand why people excuse abusive, manipulative behavior because of “love.” It’s not love anymore, it’s creepy obsession.

Hareton was very young when is parents died, and unlike Neville, never knew much about them until he was in his early twenties when Cathy tells him that the house he lives in what his father’s family house. Heathcliff, from the time Hareton was around 5, systematically strips away everything about Hareton’s heritage.

Heathcliff manipulates everything around him to get petty revenge that in the end doesn’t matter. At the very least, Snape tried to protect Harry as a part of Lily. He did a terrible job except for the one time that he saves Harry from falling off his broom in the first book, but Snape and Heathcliff are focused on childish revenge fantasies that in the end don’t matter. The “wrong” in both cases were over 20 years prior. Nothing good comes of holding on to these kinds of things. It turns you into a bitter, angry person. That accomplishes nothing in the end.

Have you read Wuthering Heights? What did you think of it? Did you pull any parallels to a modern story?

Until next time Internet,

Deanna